Science/Nature

Event Horizon Telescope: Black hole produces twisting jet

[ad_1] Image copyright EHT Collaboration Image caption The right-hand image was captured with a less powerful telescope. It shows the jet streaming away to the lower-right. In the new EHT image on the left, scientists can now see detail where the jet connects to the accretion disc. The supermassive black hole will be somewhere at the disc's centre One year on from publishing the first ever image of a black
Science/Nature

Climate change: UK forests ‘could do more harm than good’

[ad_1] Image copyright JEFF OVERS Mass tree planting in the UK could harm the environment if not planned properly, a report warns. Badly-planned trees would increase greenhouse gas emissions, say the government’s advisers on the economic value of the natural environment.The report comes from the Natural Capital Committee (NCC), which says planting trees into peat bogs would prove a serious mistake.Peat locks up vast quantities of carbon - but trees
Science/Nature

Coronavirus complicates journeys home from Antarctica

[ad_1] Image copyright JULIA WELLNER/UNI OF HOUSTON Image caption A UK-US research team was working on a ship off West Antarctica when the pandemic was declared The British Antarctic Survey (BAS) says it can now bring home all of its staff that need to leave the White Continent. At the end of the Southern Hemisphere summer, everyone except a core team is extracted - but that procedure has been complicated
Science/Nature

Whale sharks: Atomic tests solve age puzzle of world’s largest fish

[ad_1] Image copyright Wayne Osborn Image caption Researcher Mark Meekan diving with a whale shark Data from atomic bomb tests conducted during the Cold War have helped scientists accurately age the world's biggest fish.Whale sharks are large, slow moving and docile creatures that mainly inhabit tropical waters. They are long-lived but scientists have struggled to work out the exact ages of these endangered creatures. But using the world's radioactive legacy
Science/Nature

Coronavirus: Putting the spotlight on the global wildlife trade

[ad_1] Image copyright Getty Images Image caption Sun bear rescued from wildlife traffickers in Indonesia Conservation experts say the coronavirus pandemic, which likely originated at a market selling wild animals in China, is a watershed moment for curbing the global wildlife trade, which can drive extinction and spread disease.When Adam Peyman walked into a restaurant in Vietnam to order a meal he was shocked to find wild animals, including threatened
Science/Nature

10 years to save ‘world’s most threatened sea turtle’

[ad_1] Image copyright fundaoprncipe_ffi Image caption Numbers are declining due to accidental fishing and egg collecting The largest turtle in the ocean, the leatherback gets its name from its tough, rubbery skin.Migrating long distances a year, the turtle can cross the Pacific Ocean.But with threats like getting tangled in fishing gear, the future for one distinct population looks "dire," say conservation groups.At the current rate of decline, the critically endangered
Science/Nature

Coronavirus will transform UK work and travel, says AA

[ad_1] Image copyright AFP Image caption Is the infrastructure we need for the future better motorways or broadband super-highways? The aftermath of the Covid-19 crisis will transform the way we live, work and travel in the UK, the AA says.It predicts a permanent reduction in the demand for travel because people have learned during the crisis to use home-working technology. The implications are profound for commuters and for government finances.The
Science/Nature

Conifer is top tree in urban sound absorption test

[ad_1] Image copyright Ed Suominen/Flickr Image caption The bark of larch trees was found to offer the most effective sound absorption Scientists say trees have a role to play in combating noise pollution in urban environments and have identified the best species for the job.The larch was found to be the most effective tree when it comes to absorbing noise with its bark.The conifer was the most effective out of
Science/Nature

Three human-like species lived side-by-side in ancient Africa

[ad_1] Image copyright Science Image caption The remains recovered from the cave complex include the earliest example of Homo erectus - a direct human ancestor Two million years ago, three different human-like species were living side-by-side in South Africa, a study shows.The findings underline a growing understanding that the present-day situation, where one human species dominates the globe, may be unusual compared with the evolutionary past.The new evidence comes from
Science/Nature

Coronavirus: Expert panel to assess face mask use by public

[ad_1] Image copyright Reuters Should more of us wear face masks to help slow the spread of coronavirus?This question is to be assessed by a panel of advisers to the World Health Organization (WHO).The group will weigh up research on whether the virus can be projected further than previously thought; a study in the US suggests coughs can reach 6m and sneezes up to 8m.The panel's chair, Prof David Heymann,